haunted houses, Christmas weddings, rebel librarians: mini reviews!

The House Next Door by Anne Rivers Siddons | orig. 1978
Colquitt and Walter live a quiet, private, and privileged life. Each house on their street is bigger and more lavish than the one before it and the neighborhood parties are legendary. Unlike their neighbors, however, Colquitt and Walter are fortunate enough to have an empty lot on one side of their property – until the day its sold and a young architect arrives with an even younger couple (Daddy is footing the bill for their wildly expensive dream home). Even before the house is finished, everyone agrees it’s downright gorgeous. Then odd things begin happening, initially written off as tragic coincidences, though Colquitt slowly begins to suspect something far more evil is to blame.

From the moment I first heard about this book and immediately put in a request at the library I was beyond excited to read this book. I’ve mentioned it both on the blog and on Instagram, giddily sharing lines and snippets once I finally was able to dive in. I was in the mood for a good, Halloween read, and what could be better than a haunted house??

On the surface, I enjoyed The House Next Door. It was one of those reads where I was completely immersed while reading and when I wasn’t I was thinking about it and looking forward to my lunchbreaks so I could sneak in a few chapters. However, this book was originally published in the 70s and has some pretty outdated views: the only family in the neighborhood with small children is labeled trashy and low class, allowing their brood to run around acting out and terrorizing everyone in sight. At one point the house turns two men gay. ..yeah. This is highly scandalous and shocking enough to result in death after the father-in-law of one of the men has a heart attack upon discovering the two and dies.

So although there are some scenes and opinions that had me, a reader in 2018, raising my eyebrows, I had fun with this one. How could you go wrong with an evil house doing sinister things to families, especially the week of Halloween? A word of caution though: don’t become attached to any of the animals or pets mentioned.

Christmas at the Chalet by Anita Hughes | October 16, 2018
Prior to this one, I had only read one other novel by Anita Hughes (California Summer), but enjoyed it to the point where I happily picked up a Christmas novel in October. Felicity, owner of Felicity Grant Bridal, is convinced she’ll wake up on Christmas morning to an engagement ring. After all, she’s almost 30 (spoiler: I began the eye-rolling in the first chapter) and has been with Adam six years. They have the same goals and want the same things out of life, so it’s only a matter of time before he finally proposes. Unfortunately for Felicity, the day arrives without a ring and, instead of happily announcing their engagement, the two have a massive fight, resulting in Felicity storming off angry to Switzerland where she’s about to take part in a fashion show that could take her career to a new level. One of her models, Nell, has a wedding coming up..only Nell’s newly-divorced parents hate each other to the point where they insist she has two weddings just so they don’t have to see each other.

Look I’m definitely in the minority here. Other reviews for this book have been great so far. Sadly, I can’t echo their praise. There are three storylines in this one: Felicity’s, Nell’s, and flashback scenes featuring Nell’s parents, and I didn’t care for any of them. If anyone deserved sympathy, it was Nell. Her wedding should be her day and I felt so sorry that her parents were selfish enough to where they couldn’t put aside their difference and act civil for a few hours. Felicity was the worst, though. Her end game is to have a ring on her finger, regardless of how Adam feels. And when it seems she’s finally going to get her wish? She has a complete character change and brushes Adam off. Uh? There’s another love interest here, a doctor named Gabriel, and their scenes literally amounted to a handful of pages where each conversation consisted of Gabriel admonishing Felicity for not wearing a coat/hat and suggesting she might have a concussion or broken ankle. He also told her fairy tales. So imagine my surprise when they confess they’ve fallen in love with one another. Uh???

Property of the Rebel Librarian by Allison Varnes | September 18, 2018
When June brings home a book from her school library, she doesn’t think anything of it. After all, she’s an avid reader and adores her librarian – Ms. Bradshaw has yet to steer June wrong when it comes to books! June’s parents, however, take one look at the title (The Makings of a Witch), say it’s much too scary for their 7-grade daughter, and immediately march down to the school to an emergency PTA meeting. From there, a full-scale investigation is launched; Ms. Bradshaw is put on leave and books are tossed into industrial-size garbage cans. What’s worse, June’s books at home have undergone the same treatment: her parents have taken all of her books, refusing to give them back until they’ve been read and deemed appropriate (and thoroughly edited – her parents have ripped out pages, blacked out sentences, re-written entire endings). June refuses to stand by silently and, with the help of a Little Free Library, becomes the Rebel Librarian, running a full-scale library out of an empty locker.

Oh, this book was great. Characters and scenes saw me seeing red. It was bad enough that the school was banning books, but to have June’s books at home confiscated?? I can’t imagine. There’s some filler with crushes and her best friend, but I was far more intrigued by the library June created. This was a one-sitting read and I have never been more thankful my parents never tried to censor what I read.

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